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This minimally-invasive procedure repairs a vertebral compression fracture. It helps restore the spine's natural shape. Some patients experience rapid pain relief after the procedure.

This minimally-invasive procedure is an injection of bone cement into a vertebra. It stabilizes a compression fracture of the spine. One or more vertebrae may need to be treated.

 

This is a stretching or tearing of a ligament on the inner side of your knee. The medial collateral ligament, commonly called the "MCL", is connected to the femur and to the tibia. The MCL helps stabilize your knee. This ligament, along with the lateral collateral ligament, helps prevent excessive side-to-side movement of your knee joint. It helps keep the upper and lower leg aligned properly.

This is a stretching or tearing of a ligament on the outer side of your knee. The lateral collateral ligament, commonly called the "LCL", connects the femur to the fibula. The LCL helps stabilize your knee. This ligament, along with the medial collateral ligament, helps prevent excessive side-to-side movement of your knee joint. It helps keep the upper and lower leg aligned properly.

 

This injury involves two small bones under the foot near the big toe. They are called "sesamoid" bones. They aren't directly connected to other bones of the foot. Instead, the sesamoids are embedded in tendons. With sesamoiditis, these bones and the tendons around them become irritated and inflamed.

Frozen shoulder is stiffening of your shoulder. It happens over time, and you may not know what caused it. With a frozen shoulder, it can be hard for you to be as active as you like.

Your spinal nerves travel through your spinal canal and exit through openings we call "foramen." If any of these spaces are too narrow, your nerves become compressed. We say you have "spinal stenosis." It's a problem that most often happens in the neck and lower back.

 

This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the cervica spine. Because these nerves travel to the shoulders, arms and hands, an injury in the cervical spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Cervical radiculopathy may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the cervical spinal column. This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the lumbar spine. Because these nerves travel to the hips, buttocks, legs and feet, an injury in the lumbar spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Sciatica may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the lumbar spinal column.

This injury is a tearing of the ACL ligament in the knee joint. The ACL ligament is one of the bands of tissue that connects the femur to the tibia. An ACL tear can be painful. It can cause the knee to become unstable.

This is a problem on the outer side of your thigh. It's an inflammation of the iliotibial band. That's a thick band of tissue that spans from your hip to your shinbone. When this band becomes in inflamed, it can hurt.

Knee pain may keep you from being as active as you like. And it may come from a gradual breakdown of your knee's cartilage. That's a protective tissue on the ends of your bones. In a healthy knee, the bones glide smoothly against each other. But in a knee with osteoarthritis, cartilage begins to wear away. Bone rubs against bone. Bony bumps we call "bone spurs" may form.

This is a pain you feel in the front of your knee. It involves the patella. That's the bone we commonly call the "kneecap." The patella slides up and down in a groove on your femur as you bend and extend your knee. If you have this syndrome, you may have injured the soft tissues that support and cushion your kneecap. Or, you may have some damage to the cartilage on the underside of the kneecap.

If you have a joint problem, your surgeon may want to try arthroscopy. This lets your surgeon see inside your joint with a small, thin camera called an "arthroscope." It can be used on any joint, but let's see it in the knee.

Between the vertebrae of your spine are soft discs. They let your spine twist and bend. They absorb shocks. But if damaged, the disc's soft center can push through the disc wall. That's a herniated disc. This bulge presses against nerves in your spine. This condition is a rupture of one of the vertebral discs in your neck. A herniated disc can allow disc material to press harmfully against the spinal nerves.

This is a collapse of vertebral bone. It can affect one or more vertebrae. Compression fractures typically develop in your mid or lower back. This can change the shape of your spine.

This condition involves the radial nerve in your elbow. The radial nerve passes down your arm to your hand. Its branches travel into your thumb, forefinger and middle finger. With this condition, your radial nerve is compressed, stretched or irritated.

 

This is an injury of the acromioclavicular joint (commonly called the "AC" joint). This is the joint where the clavicle meets the scapula. A shoulder separation is a stretching or a tearing of the ligaments that support these bones. This allows the bones to move out of position.

This condition is an irritation or compression of one or more nerve roots in the lumbar spine. Because these nerves travel to the hips, buttocks, legs and feet, an injury in the lumbar spine can cause symptoms in these areas. Sciatica may result from a variety of problems with the bones and tissues of the lumbar spinal column.

 


 

A high ankle sprain is a stretch or tear of one or more ligaments above the ankle. The ligaments form the syndesmosis. They connect the bones of the lower leg (the tibia and fibula) and give your ankle stability.

 

Ligaments are fibrous, elastic bands of tissue that connect and stabilize the bones. An ankle sprain is a common, painful injury that occurs when one or more of the ankle ligaments is stretched beyond the normal range of motion. Sprains can occur as a result of sudden twisting, turning or rolling movements.

 

This is an injury of the middle part of the foot, where the metatarsal bones of the forefoot connect to the cuneiform bones of the midfoot. It can involve torn ligaments, broken bones or a combination of both. And, it can involve more than one joint.

 

This condition is a thickening of the nerve sheath that surrounds a nerve in the ball of the foot. It most commonly develops between the third and fourth toes. It also commonly occurs between the second and third toes.

 

 

 

Stress fractures are one or more tiny cracks in a bone. These fractures are common in the legs and feet. That's because your legs and feet have to support your weight and absorb the forces of walking, running and jumping.


 

Shouder impingement is a painful pinching of soft tissues in your shoulder. It happens when these tissues rub and press against a part of your shoulder blade called the "acromion." This can irritate your rotator cuff tendons, and also a soft sac called the "subacromial bursa."


 

A Slap Tear is a shoulder injury. It's a tear of the labrum. That's a ring of cartilage that surrounds the shoulder socket and helps hold the head of the humerus in place. This type of tear happens where the biceps tendon attaches to the labrum.

 

Growth plates are places where new bone tissue forms. They are found near the ends of the long bones in growing children. Growth plates are weaker than the surrounding bone. That makes them easier to injure. 


This is a problem with a tendon in your elbow. It's called the "distal biceps tendon." It connects the biceps muscle of your upper arm to the radius bone at the elbow. With this condition, the tendon becomes painfully inflamed or irritated.


 

This condition involves the radial nerve in your elbow. The radial nerve passes down your arm to your hand. Its branches travel into your thumb, forefinger and middle finger. With this condition, your radial nerve is compressed, stretched or irritated.